General Education Courses

AP/HUMA 1100 9.00 Worlds Of Ancient Greece & Rome

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

A study of the classical world with a view to developing a critical understanding of the origin, nature, and evolution of some of the literary, philosophical and political ideals of ancient Greece and Rome. Materials for this study will be drawn from ancient Greek and Roman literature in translation.

ASSIGNMENTS:

Participation and class preparedness (10%); tutorial quizzes and assignments (10%); first major essay (15%); mid-year examination (20%); second major essay (20%); final examination (25%).

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:

Aeschylus: Agamemnon, Libation Bearers, and Eumenides; Bible (selections); Hesiod: Works & Days and Theogony; Homer: The Iliad; Livy: Book 1 of The Early History of Rome; Plato: Euthyphro, Apology, Phaedo, and Symposium; Sophocles: Antigone and Oedipus the King; Virgil: The Aeneid.

COURSE DIRECTOR:
M. Khimji

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HUMA 1710 6.00

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HUMA 1100 9.00, AK/HUMA 1710 6.00

AP/HUMA 1105 9.00 Myth And Imagination In Greece And Rome

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

The myths of the ancient Greeks and Romans constitute a continuous tradition that stretches back beyond the writing of history down to our present day. These narratives have survived for millennia because they continue to compel, fascinate, and inspire their audiences, despite differences in language, historical era, and social context. The legends of complex, larger-than-life mythological heroes like Hercules, Theseus, and Odysseus have been retold and reimagined countless times, as have the dark and difficult tales of Medea, Persephone, and Oedipus. The search for the meaning of these myths has profoundly influenced a wide range of intellectual disciplines including psychoanalysis, anthropology, and literary criticism, while visual artists, musicians, writers, film makers, and game designers have returned to these stories for inspiration time and again. Ancient Greek and Roman mythology continues to exercise a fundamental influence on western culture, including popular culture.

This course has three objectives: (a) students will achieve familiarity with the major mythological narratives of the ancient classical world in their historical and cultural context; (b) students will develop the conceptual tools to understand how this culture and its myths are both familiar and alien to contemporary cultures and to think about how ancient mythology can provide us with ideas for understanding and critiquing our own culture and its myths; and finally, (c) as a Foundations course, students will acquire a solid grounding for undergraduate study by learning critical academic skills that can be used in this course and also transferred to other courses and environments. We will focus on developing the following strengths: reading, comprehending, and thinking critically about a variety of kinds of texts; writing clear, logical, and persuasive academic prose; participating constructively and collaboratively in group discussions and debates.

ASSIGNMENTS:

Diagnostic writing exercise; short essay; longer essay; mid-term and final exams, participation in tutorial.

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:

Hesiod, Theogony; Works and Days; The Homeric Hymns; Homer, The Odyssey; Sophocles, Oedipus Rex; Euripides, Bacchae; Livy, Early History of Rome; Ovid, Metamorphoses, Fasti; Seneca, Medea.

COURSE DIRECTOR: (Section A) S. Blake

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 1105 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1106 9.00 Egypt in the Greek & Roman Mediterranean

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course looks at the Ancient Near East and Mediterranean world from the perspective of cultural exchange, focusing on Egypt from 1000 BCE to the 2nd century CE.  Students will be introduced to the history and culture of Pharaonic Egypt and will study its interactions with other societies. They will trace its fall from superpower status at the end of the Bronze Age through a period of internal division and foreign invasion, to the country’s long term colonization by Macedonians and Greeks and later Roman rule. They will learn how Egypt became home to different cultural and ethnic communities and how its culture adapted to this situation. This course places particular emphasis on the study of religious concepts and practices, especially as they relate to state sponsored ideologies and social developments.

ASSIGNMENTS:

Diagnostic Essay – no grade assigned

Second Essay– 10 %

Third Assignment – 5%

Fourth Assignment and Class Presentation –15%

Three In-class exams @ 10% each– 30%

Major Assignment in Second Term – 30%

Class Participation– 10%

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:

Apuleius, The Golden Ass, translated by P. G. Walsh,  Oxford University Press, 1994.

Euripides, The Bacchae, translated by Paul Woodruff   Indianapolis: Hackett, 1999.

  1. Grajetzki (ed.), Digital Egypt for Universities, background reading and reference)

Herodotus, The Histories, (tr. R. Waterfield), Oxford: OUP, 1998.

Plutarch, Roman Lives (tr. R. Waterfield), Oxford: OUP, 1999.

Readings in Humanities 1106,09, Toronto: Scholars’ Press (course kit)

  1. K. Simpson (ed.), The Literature of Ancient Egypt (3rd edition). New Haven: Yale, 2003.

COURSE DIRECTOR: R. Gillam

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

Course credit exclusion: AP/HUMA 2110 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014).

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 2110 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1125 9.00 Civilization Of Medieval And Renaissance Europe

*not offered FW17*

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

The course explores two stages in European civilization -- the Middle Ages and the Renaissance -- to which our present politics, religion, intellectual and artistic culture owe much. We look for the themes, tensions, habits of thought, values and manias that link and distinguish these two eras. The Middle Ages began when Rome collapsed (ca. 500) and shaded slowly into the Renaissance (1350-1630), just after the Black Death swept through Europe. The Middle Ages were not "dark." Though turbulent and at first impoverished, they produced feudal kingdoms, gothic cathedrals, and brilliant logical philosophy. In the first term we meet medieval hermits, saints, dragons, knights, crusaders, burghers, and assorted lovers, happy and unhappy. The Renaissance saw the beginnings of modernity emerge out of the medieval past. Great individual achievements blossomed in a world reshaped by commercial expansion, political consolidation and religious crisis. It was a time of cultural flux and growth, where novelty challenged tradition, and optimism vied with deep anxiety. In the second term, we encounter poets, storytellers, philosophers, sly politicians, acute scientists, and, again, men and women of deep faith. The course has two deep lessons: the “pastness of the past” and “the textuality of text” (for writings have their rules). As a Foundations course, Humanities 1125 9.0 puts great stress on critical skills, and particularly on students’ own writing.

AP/HUMA 1160 9.00 The Enlightenment And Human Understanding

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

A fundamental feature of the Enlightenment is the view that human experience is the foundation of gaining knowledge and truth. We focus on selected Enlightenment writers and thinkers in order to understand this approach to learning.

This course, which is interdisciplinary in its approach, will begin with an examination of pre-Enlightenment views of method and truth. We will then examine the scientific revolution which influenced writers and thinkers in the Enlightenment period. Once this has been completed, we will turn to the writings of selected Enlightenment thinkers. Authors to be studied include Thomas Hobbes, René Descartes, Baruch Spinoza, Blaise Pascal, John Locke, George Berkeley, and David Hume. We will examine their methodological concerns as well as how the choice of method guides their respective investigations.

Course Director: S. Tweyman

AP/HUMA 1165 9.00 Gods and Humans

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities)

 This course explores the interactions between gods and humans in literature, art, and philosophy.  We focus on critical questions, emotional struggles, and personal journeys that characterize interactions between the two worlds.  Special attention is given to the reasons why religious and secular people are interested in these interactions today.

Using texts, films, and diverse works of art, we personally, publicly, and critically engage in the richly living struggle for faith, wisdom, and beauty in our everyday world.  This course concentrates on the struggle to be good, personal trials and transformations, the challenges of modernity, and the music of the gods.

ASSIGNMENTS:

Online critical writing engagements - 40%

Midterm examination - 20%

Research paper - 25%

Class Participation - 15%

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:

  1. The Saga of the Volsungs, translated by Jesse L. Byock (London: Penguin, 1999).
  2. Gilgamesh, translated byStephen Mitchell (London: Penguin, 2005).
  3. The Warrior Song of King Gesar, translated by Douglas Penick (Boulder: Mountain Treasury Press, 2013).
  4. The Essential Rumi, translated by Coleman Barks (New York: HarperCollins, 2004).
  5. The Interior Castle, St. Teresa of Avila, translated by Mirabai Starr, (New York: Riverhead Books, 2003).
  6. A Grief Observed, C.S. Lewis (New York: Harper Collins, 1994).
  7. Miguel de Unamuno, Saint Manuel, Martyr, translated by Mary Marc (CreateSpace, 2009).
  8. Klee Wyck, Emily Carr (Vancouver: Douglas and McIntyre, 2003).
  9. The Gospel Sound: Good News and Bad Times, Anthony Heilbut (New York: Limelight Editions, 1997).

COURSE DIRECTOR: E.Bronson

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

 

AP/HUMA 1170 9.00 The Modern Age: Shapers & Definers

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

For the last couple hundred years or so, many people in the West, and increasingly beyond it, have often characterized themselves and their world as “modern.”  But what does it mean to be modern and what does it mean to live in a modern age?  What makes modernity different from other kinds of social organization and cultural expression that have existed in the world and continue to exist in it?  This course will explore these questions by taking a threefold approach.  First, we shall seek to understand the historical development of modernity through the Early Modern period, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Modernism, and Postmodernism.  Second, we shall seek to understand what modernity is and how to think through what is involved in living in a modern world.  And, finally, we will turn to a consideration of modernity in our present world by looking at some the major contemporary assessments of modernity and by thinking about the interaction of modernity and globalization.  In working through these three approaches, we will discuss major figures (shapers and definers) from philosophy, politics, literature, and art.

ASSIGNMENTS:

Participation 10%; Presentation 5%; Diagnostic Essay 15%; Passage Analysis Essay 20%; Thematic Essay 25%; Final Exam 25%.

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:

Shakespeare, Hamlet; Immanuel Kant, “What is Enlightenment?”; William Blake, Songs of Innocence and Experience (selections); Karl Marx, Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts; Charles Baudelaire, Painter of Modern Life; Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science (selections); Sigmund Freud, “The Unconscious” and Civilization and Its Discontents; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; (subject to change)

COURSE DIRECTOR:  M. Cauchi (Section A)

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HUMA 1750 6.00.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 1750 6.00, AS/HUMA 1170 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1200 9.00 Contexts Of Canadian Culture

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course will examine the social and cultural contexts of Canada in the modern age, from the late 19th to the late 20th century. It will emphasize the impact of transformative developments--such as industrialization, immigration, wars, depression, prosperity, and international events--on the behaviour and beliefs of everyday Canadians, and how such ideological and social changes were, in turn, manifested in the popular culture, including literature, film, and art.

COURSE DIRECTOR: K. Bird

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HUMA 1740 6.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 1740 6.00, AS/HUMA 1200 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1250 6.00 Diaspora Communities and Global Cultures

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course focuses on the ways that diasporic people conceive of, express, and represent their experiences in migration, settlement, and culture. Diaspora is a term that describes a group of people who identify with a particular nationality, region, religion, ethnicity, culture, or language, but have, for various reasons, migrated to different parts of the world. People in diasporas may live distantly from each other or from a place they consider to be ‘home’, but may still consider themselves to be part of a collective identity, community, or culture. The cultural and historical contexts with which these groups are associated can be very different, though there may be common elements to diasporic experiences. The course asks how diasporic writers and artists confront and critique ideas of ‘tradition’ and ‘culture’. How do diaspora communities maintain connections with a ‘home’ place or culture? How do people in diasporas forge new identities? What challenges are experienced by diasporic people in their places of settlement? What new cultural formations emerge in diasporic artistic expressions such as literature, music, and film? To explore these questions, students will engage with a number of theoretical texts and thinkers on the concept of diaspora, as well as literary works, films, and music produced by and about diasporic people.

To provide a focus for discussion, this course will emphasize Canada as a location for diasporic engagement, while also considering the global reach of diaspora cultures. The course will feature works from Jewish, African, South Asian, Chinese, Japanese, Caribbean, and Latin American diasporas. Topics could include: forms of diasporic labour; the African diaspora and the slave trade; people in exile; race and ethnicity in diasporas; Canadian multiculturalism and diasporic diversity; hybrid identities; second and third generation diasporas; diaspora and religion; double diasporas; music and diasporic identities.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

AP/HUMA 1300 9.00 Cultures Of Resistance In The Americas: The African American Experience

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course addresses the ways in which diasporic Africans have responded to and resisted their enslaved and subordinated status in the Americas. Resistance is first addressed in relationship to slavery, but later in the course resistance is seen in a much broader context: in response to post-colonial and post-civil rights, and as an engagement of national, economic, cultural and social forces. Thus, resistance might be understood as a continuing legacy of black peoples' existence in the Americas. Resistance is, first, read in relationship to European domination in the Americas and, second, to national and other post-emancipation forms of domination which force us to think of resistance in increasingly more complex ways. The "anatomy of prejudices"— sexism, homophobia, class oppression, racism—come under scrutiny as the course attempts to articulate the libratory project.

The course focuses, then, on the cultural experiences of African diasporic peoples, examining the issues raised through a close study of black cultures in the Caribbean, the United States and Canada. It critically engages the ways in which cultural practices and traditions have survived and been transformed in the context of black subordination. It addresses the aesthetic, religious and ethical practices that enable black people to survive and build "communities of resistance" and allow them both to carve out a space in the Americas they can call home and to contribute variously to the cultures of the region.

ASSIGNMENTS:
essay (15%), textual analysis (15%) research assignment (20%), oral report (15%), class participation (10%), final exam (25%); (subject to change).

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:
Henry Louis Gates Jr, ed., The Classic Slave Narratives; Gloria Naylor, Mama Day; Earl Lovelace, The Dragon Can’t Dance; Edwidge Danticat, Breath, Eyes, Memory; Course Kit of articles from selected journals and anthologies. (subject to change)

COURSE DIRECTOR: A.Davis

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 1300 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1320 6.00 Ideas of America

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course addresses cultural developments and transformations in North America from the period of European contact to the present. Following a comparative investigation of imperialism and nationalism in shaping the cultures of Canada, the United States and Mexico, the course offers a close examination of North America in the 20th century devoting particular attention to the realm of popular culture.

Course Director: TBA

AP/HUMA 1400 9.00 Culture And Society In East Asia

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

No single course can adequately address the richness and complexity of the cultures and societies of East Asia. However, this course will introduce students to important practices and concepts from a broadly humanistic perspective and offer a peek into what it might have been like to actually live in East Asia before widespread globalization. In order to do this, we will examine elements of the social, political, philosophical, artistic, and economic traditions that shaped both elite and popular culture in East Asia from the 1600s to the early 1800s. Our sources will include cultural artifacts (e.g., poems, paintings, clothing, etc.) from this period, writings by East Asians on their own and their neighboring societies, observations on East Asia by contemporary outsiders, and secondary sources by modern scholars who explore particularly challenging topics in depth. By analyzing both the forging of shared beliefs and the development of distinct identities in this critical period, we can better understand the ties between historical and contemporary East Asia, as well as between East Asia and the rest of the world.

Though the primary goal of the course is to teach students about a time and place quite removed from our own, the course is also designed to strengthen each student’s ability to comprehend and critique his or her own culture. As a foundation for broader study at the university level, we will place significant emphasis on analytical skills, class participation, research methods, and writing. Since many aspects of East Asian culture will fall outside of the course curriculum, students will be expected to learn the critical skills of asking important and interesting questions and then figuring out how to produce informative and satisfying answers.

ASSIGNMENTS:
Document analysis (5%); 2 short essays (15% each); research essay (20%); examinations (15% each); class participation (15%). Several of these components will be broken down into specific exercises that are mandatory for receiving credit. A flexible point system will be used for the bulk of your class participation grade. (subject to change)

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:
Tsao Hsueh-chin, Dream of the Red Chamber, abridged and translated by Chi-chen Wang; Shen Fu, Six Records of a Floating Life; Katsu Kokichi, Musui's Story: The Autobiography
of a Tokugawa Samurai, translated by Teruko CRAIG, Ihara Saikaku, The Life of an
Amorous Woman, translated by Ivan Morris; course reading kit.

COURSE DIRECTOR: G. Anderson

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 1400 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1420 9.00 Introduction to Korean Culture

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course offers an introduction to the study of Korean culture through a historical survey of literary, social, religious and political trends from ancient times to the present.  Emphasis will be placed on developing critical reading and writing skills in the lectures and tutorials. There will be weekly assignments to aid students in improving these skills.

 ASSIGNMENTS:

First Essay  10%

Second Essay  15%

Research Essay  25%

Mid-Term Exam  15%

Final Exam  15%

Oral Presentation  10%

Class Participation  10%

 REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:

1) Eckert, Carter, Korea Old and New, A History

2) Lee, Peter, Anthology of Korean Literature from Ancient Times to the Nineteenth Century

3) Lee, Peter, Sources of Korean Tradition

4) Buckley, Joanne, Fit to Print, The Canadian Student’s Guide to Essay Writing

5) Course Kit available in York Bookstore

COURSE DIRECTOR: T. Hyun

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HUMA 2420 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014).

AP/HUMA 1435 9.00 Japanese Culture, Literature & Film

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

An introduction to Japanese culture centred around comparisons of major classical, modern and postmodern literary works - including manga comics - as well as their screen adaptations or other related films and anime.

COURSE DIRECTOR: T. Goossen

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HUMA 2435 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014).
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HUMA 2435 9.00, AS/HUMA 3420 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2004-2005), AS/JP 3720 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2004-2005), FA/FILM 3710 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2004-2005).

AP/HUMA 1625 9.00 Fantasy And Topographies Of Imagination

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This interdisciplinary course utilizes a variety of materials to explore fantasy in the West, not as the opposite of reality, but as how people imagine and give meaning to their experiences, thereby both shaping and resisting what are typically believed to be the "realities" of Western cultures.

This course examines some of the dominating fantasies in the West. It explores how individuals (as well as groups) are influenced by them not simply in how they make meaning of their experiences, but also in how the dominating fantasies come to influence even what individuals might imagine. Throughout the course we will examine how individuals draw upon the dominating fantasies of the West to maintain and perpetuate cultural knowledges about the values of the culture, as well as definitions about what is human and what is "other", and what are appropriate human and non- human behaviours/relationships. We will also ask how it is possible for individuals to critique dominating fantasies by creating counter-fantasies that subvert and resist accepted knowledges and interpretations of experience and allow people to imagine things otherwise.

Some of the themes/issues that we will study include the power of words and images (with particular attention to propaganda and advertising and how we are sometimes trapped by language in the worlds that we have created); the role of fantasy in defining what is nature and natural; what First Nations people understand about North American fantasies and how works of fiction might be read as theory; the power of storytelling and learning to "read" primary and alternative worlds; the role of speculative/science fictions and utopias/dystopias in imagining how dominating fantasies might be told otherwise; political, religious and romantic quests; fantastic forms and spaces in architecture (with an exploration of how fantasy can directly structure our experience - often without our even being willing or conscious participants); the relationship of fantasy and body image/sexual identity; the "darkness of the mind" and the nature of monsters (with a focus on shifting our attention to a perspective which considers experiences from the position of that which is defined as "other" and/or "monster," and (re)imagining the boundaries between the forbidden and the allowed, desire and convention); popular fantasies and some failures of imagination; and the power of fantasy in imagining acts of subversion/resistance.

Students will learn to "read" multiple levels of texts and to "see" multiple perspectives offered through visual imagery. Together, we will be developing a collection of critical skill maps that will provide students with directions when they wish to explore a given text; that will help students to see the ways that some of the course materials relate to each other and to texts/experiences outside of the course; that will allow students to focus very narrowly on specific details/issues; and that will enable students to reflect on the paths that they have taken with respect to the course materials as well as on the paths that have yet to be taken. The selection of course materials as well as the design of lectures and course assignments have been done with special attention paid to a variety of learning preferences and styles so that students can hone the learning/critical strategies that already serve them well and be challenged to explore and develop new skills.

ASSIGNMENTS:
Response Papers: 5/10 each term (1% each), a 5% penalty for RPs missed or not accepted will be deducted from the grade of the Critical Thinking/Learning Portfolio ; Expanded Response Paper (10%); Essay, written in stages (15%); Fantasy Narrative/Dialogue (5%); Collaborative Research Project/Presentation, multiple stages and components (25%); Critical Thinking/Learning Portfolio (20%); Participation (15%). (Subject to change.)

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:
Sherman Alexie, The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fist Fight in Heaven; Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland / Alice Through the Looking Glass; Neil Gaiman, Sandman: Fables & Reflections v. 6; Ruth Ozeki, My Year of Meats; Robert Sawyer, Watch; Humanities 1625 9.0A Course Kit, available from the York Bookstore.

There will also be several films and visual/aural materials that will be required materials for students.

COURSE DIRECTOR: S. Rowley

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HUMA 1630 9.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HUMA 1625 9.00, AS/HUMA 1630 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1710 6.00 The Roots Of Western Culture The Ancient World (CIRCA 1000 BC-400 AD)

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course investigates the two major branches of Western thought: the Greco-Roman and the Judeo–Christian.  The course begins by critically thinking about how history is “made,”  reworked and transmitted, about oral culture, and how cultural identities emerge (ex. the Hebrews).   Most of the course will be engaged with the ancient Greeks from the Archaic period to the Classical and Hellenistic, and the Romans from the Republic to the early Empire.  The course will end with a consideration of the emergence of proto-orthodox Christianity within the surprising mix of philosophical and religious ideas in the Roman world.

Our aim will be to examine texts both critically and in context.  For example we will study the documentary hypothesis which suggests that the Hebrew Bible is a composite work from several sources, and we will consider how our knowledge of “the Greeks” is often based on scant physical remains, fragmentary literary sources which are themselves dependent on second and third hand authors.

Students will be introduced to many kinds of works that emerged in the ancient period:  epic poetry, lyric poetry, fables, parables, dramatic works, philosophical and medical treatises and historical prose.  We will want to engage in close readings of primary texts with a view to understanding key themes and ideas, historical, political, and social contexts, and religious beliefs and practices.  We will consider influences from even more ancient civilizations; highlight certain Greek gods and goddesses and their festivals;  consider the social status of women and slaves and differences between ethnic groups such as the Spartans and Athenians.  We will engage with the texts interpretively which will involve examining various perspectives, examining the use of art and literature for ideological ends, as well as examining our own embedded assumptions about the past.

Our primary texts will include most of the following and many more:  excerpts from the Hebrew Bible,  Homer, Hesiod,  Sappho, Aesop, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Aristophanes, Pythagoras, Plato, Aristotle, Herodotus, Thucydides, Hippocrates,  Livy, Virgil, Lucretius, Epicurus, Epictetus, Apuleius, Marcus Aurelius, Ovid, and excerpts from the New Testament.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

Two Course kits (one per term)

The Classical Greek Reader, Atchity, Ed.

ASSIGNMENTS:

8 Response Papers 35%

1 Group Presentation 10%

Pop Quizzes during Lecture: 10%

Midterm Exam:  15%

Essay (1500 words): 15%

Final Exam 15%

COURSE DIRECTOR: C. Bigwood

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students. Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HUMA 1110 9.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 1710 6.00, AS/HUMA 1110 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1720 6.00 The Roots Of Western Culture The Modern Period (CIRCA 1500-1900) EVENING COURSE

EVENING COURSE

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course explores the great ideas of Western Culture which still influence us today by examining the writings of the men and women who expressed those ideas in their books, essays, plays, novels, art and music. It examines the Scientific Revolution, the Ages of Enlightenment and Romanticism, including the anti-slavery crusade, and probes key political, social and economic ideologies such as liberalism, neo-liberalism and Marxism as well as the foundation of new scientific perspectives and freedom for women.

The modern period can be characterized by a series of revolutions, from the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century, through the ‘Copernican’ revolution of Kant’s critical philosophy, a demand for equal rights for women, to the Bolshevik revolution in Russia in October 1917. This course traces the emergence and development of revolutions in the modern period in the scientific, philosophical, feminist, and political senses through a close reading of primary texts, in whole or in part, that represent the revolutionary impetus of the modern age. As one of the Department of Humanities General Education courses, students will develop their skills in writing essays, analyzing primary texts, and developing arguments. Students who complete all of the assigned readings will have a solid foundation of knowledge of some of the ideas that shaped the modern period.

COURSE DIRECTOR: W. Gleberzon

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 1720 6.00.

AP/HUMA 1740 6.00 The Roots Of Modern Canada EVENING COURSE

EVENING COURSE

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course introduces the student to some of the main themes in the development of Canadian culture as they manifest themselves in Canadian history, literature, politics and fine arts. Canadian culture is studied, in large measure, as the working out of European and other traditions in the experience and consciousness of Canadians as peoples within a North American context.

COURSE DIRECTOR:  D. Azoulay

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HUMA 1200 9.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 1740 6.00, AS/HUMA 1200 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1770 6.00 One World: Historical And Cultural Perspectives Of Globalization EVENING COURSE

EVENING COURSE

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course explores the social and cultural interactions of the peoples of the World from pre‑history to the 21st century with the main emphasis placed on the period between 1500 and the present. From pre‑history onwards, people roamed the globe and interacted with each other, socially, politically, and culturally. Sometimes these interactions were the results of conquests, times of trade, yet other times the product of vast migrations over long distances. Since the 15th century, European expansion has been predominant, which produced, by the mid‑20th century, the current pattern of globalization.

ASSIGNMENTS:

Written Assignment #1 - 20%

In-class mid-term test   - 20%

Written Assignment #2 - 20%

Final Test - 20%

Tutorial Attendance and Participation           -2 0%

REQUIRED TEXT:

Patterns of World History (Combined Volume – Second Edition) by Peter von Sivers, Charles A. Desnoyers and George B. Stow. Oxford University Press, 2015.

COURSE DIRECTOR: J. Kispal-Kovacs

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/HUMA 1770 6.00.

AP/HUMA 1780 6.00A Stories In Diverse Media

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course examines the ways that certain recurrent narratives have been realized in a range of media (oral stories, literature, film, television, virtual media).  Stories are analyzed in terms of their settings, characters, action, motivation, and meaning.  We will also examine the ways that specific media technologies affect stories, storytellers, and audiences.  We will also examine the social and cultural significance and historical context for various versions of certain archetypal stories.  The course is designed to give students a knowledge of how the process of storytelling has changed in different eras and to develop a variety of techniques for interpreting a wide range of culturally significant stories.

The course is organized in six modules.  In the first, we will examine ways of interpreting and analyzing narratives, with a particular emphasis on the “dramatistic pentad,” a method for understanding how stories work devised by the literary critic Kenneth Burke.  We will also look at ways that the means of communication can affect how stories are told and how they shape the contents of particular stories.  Each of the four modules will focus on a particular type of story—the quest, the confessional, the mystery, and the anti-narrative—as they appear in various media.  In the sixth and final module, we will consider the future of storytelling in light of contemporary technological developments, particularly those associated with social media and mobile technology.

ASSIGNMENTS:

Book or Film Review (3 pages): 10%

First Term Essay (5-7 pages): 15%

Mid-Term Exam: 20%

Second Term Essay: (10 pages): 25%

Final Exam: 20%

Tutorial Participation: 10%

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:

Kalefah Sanneh, “The Reality Principle”

Selections from:

Walter J. Ong, Orality and Literacy

Kenneth Burke, A Grammar of Motives

John Cawelti, Adventure, Mystery and Romance: Formula Stories as Art and Popular Culture

Richard Slotkin, Gunfighter Nation

David Tell, Confessional Crises and Cultural Politics in Twentieth-Century America

COURSE DIRECTOR: S. Bailey (Section A)

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/HUMA 1780 6.00.

AP/HUMA 1780 6.00B Stories In Diverse Media EVENING COURSE

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities)

EVENING COURSE

This course explores storytelling, expression, and communication chronologically from oral culture to cyber culture.  We will thus encounter many radically different kinds of media from early cave paintings and symbols, music, ritual and theatre through to the advent of writing, mass print, film, photography, news and television, the internet, social media and computer gaming.

In this course we will investigate how different media can change the way we express ourselves, communicate and transmit knowledge.  We will look at how new media may adapt old media forms to suit its purpose, or may be an entirely new emergent form that encourages new habits of being, different ways of seeing and representing ourselves, and of experiencing nature, time and space.

Students will come to understand why stories are not just entertainment but crucial to human culture and how stories are constructed, including the recurring themes and character types in traditional stories, as well as the development of new narrative techniques in modern and postmodern culture.    Many visual and written works will be studied including such media forms as music, paintings, comics, short stories, as well as advertising, TV series, news, and films.   Sometimes a work may be studied with a view to its construction (for example, the construction of time in comics), or with a view to its relation to other media (for example, computer gaming can be seen as a work that unifies many art forms).  Often the political and social context of the works will be studied with a view to exposing ideologies of race, gender and class.  The varying roles of the audience as they change through history and according to the media form will also be considered.  We may relate to media, for example, as an active participant, a speaker, a reader, a passive spectator,  a consumer, a user, or through a cyber body.

Students will be expected to read on average about twenty to thirty pages per week.  Sometimes you may be required to both read an article and view a film (streaming available at the moodle website) for that week.   There will also be one short novel as required reading.  The selection of reading and viewing materials will be drawn from both canonical works of the Western tradition (ex. Gilgamesh and Don Quixote) as well as from popular culture (ex. The Matrix, and  Pulp Fiction).  However, the reading and viewing assignments for this course will not only be fictional (and non-fictional) stories and films, but will also include  a number of important theorists such as Plato, Benjamin, McLuhan, Baudrillard and Jameson who analyze media, and cultural production.   Students will thus have the opportunity to study not only the writers, film makers and other artists who make creative use of the new media opportunities and the shifts in cultural sensibilities, but also various authors who worry about, or celebrate, the remarkable social changes wrought by new media.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

Two Course Kits (one per term)

One novel

ASSIGNMENTS:

Response Papers 8 = 40%; Pop Quizzes during lecture 10%; Presentation in tutorial:  5%; Midterm Exam: 15%; 1500 word Essay:  15%; Final Exam: 15%

COURSE DIRECTOR:  C. Bigwood (Section B)

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/HUMA 1780 6.00.

AP/HUMA 1780 6.00C Stories In Diverse Media

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities)

Focuses on recurrent stories and themes that have been realized in a variety of media (film, literature, music, theatre, visual arts). Emphasized are various settings for the arts and their reception by audiences, viewers and readers.

COURSE DIRECTOR: S. Davidson (Section C)

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/HUMA 1780 6.00.

AP/HUMA 1825 9.00 Law And Morality

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course examines aspects of the relationships between law and morality in literary, filmic and philosophical works from Ancient Greece to the Modern Word and in several modern court cases.

COURSE DIRECTOR:  R. Fisher (Section A)

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 new students.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 1825 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1840 9.00 Existence, Freedom & Meaning

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

The course addresses itself to three main themes: (1) the quest for existence – faith, reason, and the foundations of the self; (2) the quest for freedom – ethics in light of relativism and the plurality of interpretations; (3) the quest for personal meaning in a social context – the paradoxes of autonomy, responsibility, and self-consciousness. The course is dedicated to the reading and discussion of major works of literature, philosophy, and religion so that the search for the distinctively human may be made as intense and as meaningful as possible.

Students and faculty meet weekly in individual two-hour discussion groups. In addition, colloquia, which bring together all students and faculty in the course, are held regularly throughout the year. There are no formal lectures.

ASSIGNMENTS:
Three essays, 25% each; final take-home examination essay 25%.

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:
Nietzsche, The Gay Science; Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling; Montaigne, Selections from the Essays; Descartes, Discourse on Method; Pascal, Selections from the Thoughts; Shakespeare, Hamlet; Berger, Invitation to Sociology; Kant, Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals; Ibsen, Ghosts and Rosmersholm; Kafka, The Trial; Buber, I and Thou; Dostoevsky, Notes from Underground.

COURSE DIRECTOR: A. Kulak

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 new students.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 1840 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1845 6.00 Islamic Traditions

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course examines the beliefs, doctrines and institutions that have constituted the Islamic tradition from its inception until the present. While analyzing some of the most important primary sources that have emerged within Islamic tradition, particular attention is placed on the variety of interpretive strategies used by Muslim exegetes, theologians, legal scholars, Sufis, feminists, etc. in their approach to issues related to the sacred texts, the Qur’an and the Hadith. Since Islamic tradition is also viewed as a cultural construct, the course explores its different manifestations throughout the Muslim world and beyond. In line with that view, the course examines the Islamic tradition in terms of its system (“Great Tradition”) and dynamics (“Little traditions”), which find expression in a wide scope of doctrines, interpretations, and concerns facing Muslims now and in the past.

This is a General Education, introductory course designed to offer basic insight into the historical and ideological unity and diversity of Islam. It provides a comprehensive survey of this religious tradition in accordance with the expectations of a first-year course. As part of the Religious Studies program, it also offers some basic tools for the study of religion in general, exploring the rules of the discipline and its specific vocabulary.  Its broader goals are to strengthen and develop transferable critical skills necessary for successful engagement with course material at the university level, in any academic discipline:  analytical and critical thinking; effective reading of scholarly texts; research and writing techniques; defining, communicating, and defending a viewpoint; building an argument; and effective collaboration with peers.

ASSIGNMENTS:

Quizzes (Five administered, four best graded, 5 % each): 20 %

Annotations on scholarly articles from the electronic reserve of Scott library: 10%

Fall-term Test: 20 %

Research proposal and annotated bibliography, based on sources used in the course, and on selected articles from the electronic resources of Scott library: 15%

Winter-term Test: 20 %

Participation: 15%

 REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:

*Frederick Denny. Introduction to Islam. Taylor and Francis;4 ed.,2010.

*Classical Islam: A sourcebook of religious literature. Edited and translated by Norman Calder, J.A. Mojaddedi and Andrew Rippin. London and New York: Routledge, 2003; E-resource 2005.

*Scholarly articles and visuals from the E-reserve of Scott library

 COURSE DIRECTOR: M. Simidchieva

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HUMA 2815 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014).
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 2815 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1846 6.00 Arts & Culture in South Asia

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course examines Indian literature, arts and culture in historical and contemporary context. The course is organized around themes and issues in Indian and South Asian culture. To contextualize the assigned material, class lectures and tutorials will explore the region’s various religious traditions, histories and politics. Arts and literature will provide a framework through which to explore a range of contemporary issues in India and the South Asian subcontinent, including (but not limited to): religion and social difference; communalism and religious conflict; environment, landscape and displacement; histories of music and dance; boundaries, nations, and partitions; gender, sexuality and rights; caste identities and caste-based oppression.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HUMA 2440 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014).

AP/HUMA 1850 6.00 The Bible And Modern Contexts EVENING COURSE

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

EVENING COURSE

This course offers a survey of much of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and the Christian Bible (New Testament). We begin with a discussion of pre-Israelite religion (i.e., a reconstruction of religion in Palestine before the composition of the Hebrew Bible) and its parallels in Mesopotamian and Egyptian religious practices and texts. Then, we move through the texts of the Hebrew Bible from Genesis to Daniel, discussing each text’s origins, themes, aims and parallels in ancient literature. In the second term we begin an examination of the New Testament noting, again, each text’s origins, themes, aims and parallels in other literature of the time. Throughout the course we will note the historical context of each of the writings, and how ideas and imagery develop over time, from one text/location to another. Students taking the course will finish having a firm grasp of how the Bible is approached in the Humanities and a sound knowledge of fundamental writings that continue to influence Western culture.

ASSIGNMENTS:

Two map quizzes, weekly tutorial assignments, six unit tests, a brief research paper, a midterm and a final exam.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

David M. Carr and Colleen M. Conway. An Introduction to the Bible: Sacred Texts and Imperial Contexts. Wiley-Blackwell, 2010; and Michael Coogan, Marc Z. Brettler, Carol Newsom and Pheme Perkins, eds. The New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised Standard Version. College Edition.4th edition. Oxford, 2010.

COURSE DIRECTOR (Section A & M):  T. Michael

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AK/HUMA 1850 6.00.

AP/HUMA 1855 9.00 Buddhism In Asian Culture

Note: Successful completion of this course fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

This course introduces the diversity of Buddhist ideas and practices in Asia. Exploring Buddhism as a living tradition, it focuses on the impact and interpretation of Buddhism in historical and contemporary cultures. After developing a background in basic Buddhist philosophy we explore Buddhism’s cultural impact in literature, art, ritual, ethics, economics, social interaction and politics.

Beginning with the biography of the Buddha and origins of Buddhism in ancient India, the course covers the development of Theravada, Mahayana and Vajrayana schools. The first semester will focus on the development of Buddhist ideas and their interpretation in contemporary practice in Southeast Asia (Burma/Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia or Laos), South Asia (India, Nepal, or Sri Lanka) and East Asia (China, Japan or Korea).  The first semester's topics will include philosophical and narrative texts, art, archaeology, film and studies of ritual, including issues of monasticism and meditation.  The second semester will explore ethnographic accounts of Buddhist life and contemporary issues, including discussions of magic, alchemy, gender and sexuality, democracy, nationalism and war.

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:

Lopez, Donald S. The Story Of Buddhism : A Concise Guide To Its History And Teachings. 1st ed. San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco, 2001.

Harvey, Peter. An Introduction To Buddhism: Teachings, History, And Practices. Second Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013.

Booth, Wayne C., Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams. The Craft of Research. 3rd ed, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008.

McDaniel, Justin Thomas. The Lovelorn Ghost and the Magical Monk Practicing Buddhism in Modern Thailand. New York: Columbia University Press, 2011.

Rowe, Mark Michael. Bonds of the Dead: Temples, Burial, and the Transformation of Contemporary Japanese Buddhism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

RESERVED SPACES: All spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

AP/HUMA 1860 6.00 The Nature Of Religion EVENING(A) ONLINE(B)

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

EVENING COURSE *1860 6.0A
ONLINE COURSE *1860 6.0B

Explores the nature of religious faith, religious language (myth and symbol) and clusters of religious beliefs through an examination of the primary texts of several major world religions. Methodologies for the study of religion will also be examined.

This course is a critical study, based on classical and contemporary readings, of such issues as: the basis of religious claims, the meaning of religious discourse, the relationship between faith and reason, the nature and existence of God, the nature of religious experience, and the problems of evil and human destiny.

We will critically examine the nature and various expressions of religious questions about human life, death, suffering, and the afterlife. One of our main goals is to better appreciate religion as it exists in a modern global society. We will examine many different views and ideas in this course. What is sacred? What role do myth, ritual, and scripture play in people’s lives today? Should we (I) care about the transcendent?

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
Course Credit Exclusions: AP/HUMA 2800 9.00, AP/SOSC 2600 9.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 1860 6.00, AS/HUMA 2800 9.00, AS/SOSC 2600 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1865 6.00 Introduction to the Study of Religion

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course introduces students to a variety of human religious experiences and traditions. This year we will explore the history, literature, practices and contemporary issues of the following religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese and Japanese traditions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. We will study and critically analyze the sacred texts in translation and the various concepts of the lived traditions. As a Foundations course we will include the teaching in both lectures and tutorials of a variety of critical skills and basic research methodologies including: critical reading of primary and secondary sources, forms of essay writing and referencing in the Humanities and Social Sciences, and critical thinking.

COURSE DIRECTORS: G. Anderson & D.Burke

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
Course Credit Exclusions: AP/HUMA 1860 6.00, AP/HUMA 2800 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014),
AP/SOSC 2600 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014).
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 1860 6.00, AS/HUMA 2800 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1870 6.00 The Bible And The Arts

Note: Successful completion of this course fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

This course looks at selected passages from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and their interpretative reflection in the western artistic tradition, including pictorial/representational art, music, literature, and cinema.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

RESERVED SPACES: All spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

AP/HUMA 1875 9.00 Christianity in Context

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This is an introductory course. It offers a general overview of the Christian tradition. From its beginnings, Christianity has been inextricably intertwined with the societies and cultures surrounding it. The focus of this course is the rituals, practices, beliefs and texts of Christianity, and how they were shaped by the political, social and cultural environments with which Christianity came into contact as it spread around the globe. Particular attention is paid to the diversity of Christian beliefs and practices resulting from those interactions.

This course examines Christianity as a socio-historical phenomenon. It explores with the tools of the academic study of religion the movements, texts, beliefs and practices of this religious tradition and the factors and forces shaping them.

This Foundations course focuses on the following critical skills:

1) Critical reading of primary and secondary texts

2) Critical thinking: examining the complex intersection of factors shaping the texts, beliefs, practices and debates within Christianity, and our own assumptions about them

3) Writing skills: planning, organising, writing and documenting an academic essay

4) Presentation skills: planning, preparing and executing a presentation

5) Introduction to the terms and concepts related to the academic study of religion

ASSIGNMENTS: (subject to change)

Two in-class tests – 20% each; Research Report – 20%; Research Essay, including proposal and annotated bibliography – 20%; Weekly Reading Assignments – 10%; Participation – 10%.

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS: (subject to change)

  1. Jacobsen, The World’s Christians: Who They Are, Where They Are, and How They Got There, Wiley-Blackwell, 2011. R. E. Van Voorst, ed., Readings in Christianity, 3rd ed., Wadsworth, 2015; Course Kit: Selections from M. J. Weaver, Introduction to Christianity, 4th ed., Wadsworth, 2009; M. Northey, Making sense: A student's guide to research and writing: Religious Studies, OUP, 2011.

COURSE DIRECTOR:  T. Michael

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students. Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HUMA 2835 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014).

AP/HUMA 1880 6.00 The Jewish Experience, Civilization and Culture

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

An examination of the interaction of Jews and gentiles in selected periods from antiquity through the 20th century. A case study in ethnic adaptation, the course seeks to understand how Jews sometimes adapted their lives to the world around them, and at other times withdrew into themselves, and how at certain times they exerted considerable influence on the people among whom they lived or who lived among them.

COURSE DIRECTOR: K. Weiser

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HUMA 2850 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014).

AP/HUMA 1900 9.00 Traditional and Popular Culture

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course deals with the form, meaning and content of traditional and popular levels of culture, and discusses the respective roles of each in the human environment.

Genres of traditional culture studied include folktales, legends, myth, and traditional belief. The course will also study popular culture, the impact of the mass media, and how they contribute to the creation of gender and ethnic stereotypes.

Course Director: G. Butler

AP/HUMA 1905 9.00 Science Fiction Culture

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

Science fiction has emerged as one of the most popular genres in our contemporary culture. Why are science fiction texts, including novels, short stories, films, and television shows, so culturally pervasive, and what does their popularity tell us about the impact of science and technology? This course will examine how science fiction, from its origins with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein to its more recent manifestations, has given cultural expressions to changing--and often ambivalent--attitudes towards modern science and technology.

The first half of the course will focus on the historical development of science fiction and the parallel developments of science and technology in their cultural context. Among the topics to be covered are responses to Enlightenment and Victorian science, representations of the scientist, scientific utopias, the mechanized society, and the reactions of science fiction authors to the brave new worlds of genetics, the Bomb, and space travel. In the second term we will concentrate on the attitudes of contemporary science fiction writers and film makers towards the cultural significance of science and technology. Themes to be discussed include feminist sf, the physics of time travel, the infinite universes of some interpretations of quantum mechanics, the threat of catastrophe (including environmental) due to technological progress, depictions of the process of scientific discovery, the complex relationship between science and religion, the ethical issues raised by the biotechnology revolution, and the disappearing boundaries between human and computer.

ASSIGNMENTS:
First Term short essay, 10%; First term long essay, 20%; Second term long essay, 20%; Group report on one of the second term themes 10%; Class Participation 15%; Final Exam 25%. (subject to change)

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (1831); Jules Verne, From the Earth to the Moon (1865); H.G. Wells, The Time Machine (1895); Yevgeny Zamyatin, We (1924); Aldous Huxley, Brave New World (1932); Stanley G. Weinbaum, "A Martian Odyssey" (1934); Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness (1969); Phyllis Gotlieb, "Tauf Aleph" (1981); Walter M. Miller, Jr., A Canticle for Leibowitz (1959); George Alec Effinger, "Schrodinger's Kitten" (1987); Mary Doria Russell, The Sparrow (1996); films such as The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951); 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968); Blade Runner (1982); Gattaca (1997); Contact (1997). Short stories and articles are found in the course kit.

COURSE DIRECTOR: J. Keeping

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course Credit Exclusion: AS/HUMA 1905 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1910 9.00 Science And The Humanities

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

This course is concerned with the different and changing relationships of the sciences and the humanities.  Human beings are a part of nature and are often studied as natural objects. Indeed, many would argue that science is best able to determine what constitutes human nature. Many developments in the sciences also have a direct impact on the personal and social lives of human beings, in both positive and negative ways. But science is itself a human activity practiced in specific social contexts. Natural objects are studied by human subjects whose interests and assumptions shape their view of the phenomena they examine.  The particular understandings of nature put forward by particular scientists are informed by a wide range of sources, from philosophy to religion, to art, literature, and politics.  This applies as much to the beginning of the twenty-first century as it does to the beginning of the sixteenth century.

The course explores themes in the study of nature and science both in the past and in the present. The interactions between the sciences and the humanities are examined in the course through topics including: How did science acquire cultural authority? How is science tied to cultural or national identity? To what extent can or should the sciences define what it means to be human? What are the changing images of the human body that science has given over time? What are the social and ethical responsibilities of scientists and who should determine such responsibilities? This course pursues such issues by examining the works of a wide range of natural and social scientists, philosophers, literary figures and artists.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
Course Credit Exclusions: AP/HIST 2810 6.00, AP/STS 2010 6.00, SC/STS 2010 6.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HIST 2120 6.00, AK/STS 2010 6.00
(prior to Summer 2006), AS/HUMA 1910 9.00 and SC/STS 2010 6.00.

AP/HUMA 1950 6.00 Concepts Of Male & Female In The West EVENING COURSE

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

EVENING COURSE

An examination of the origins of, and the interrelationships among, gender, male and female concepts and roles through myth, literature, art and artifacts from various Western cultures, past and present.

COURSE DIRECTOR: D. Clipperton

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HUMA 1950 9.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 1830 6.00, AS/HUMA 1950 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1951 9.00 Introduction To Gender

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit (Humanities).

Course is on Moodle and includes lecture outlines that you can download.

This course explores gender concepts in the West as they have developed and changed in response to a range of historical developments such as individualism, religious doctrines, concepts of love, the needs of capitalism, and others. Gender is broadly understood to involve both subjective experiences and social interactions. The course examines the ways in which these interact and the consequences for individuals of deviation from socially mandated norms. We explore the ways in which gender involves the concepts of anatomical sex, sexuality, love, work, romance, marriage and family as well as the ways in which these concepts control and regulate both the individual and our social and material world. Throughout the course we explore the function of various dualisms such as male-female, mind-body, active-passive, heterosexual-homosexual and others that both function to structure gender and to create categories of oppressor and oppressed.

As a general education course we will concentrate on the study and application of a wide range of theoretical perspectives to the analysis and critique of cultural productions. The works encountered in the course are drawn from the Humanities disciplines and include theoretical works, works of literature and theology, film, music and popular culture. The theoretical frameworks we encounter include a variety of feminist and other oppositional theories, psychoanalytic theory, critical theory, semiotics, and postmodern approaches. The course will also provide an introduction to mindful meditations techniques which can be used to aid in the development of focus, concentration and stress reduction.

ASSIGNMENTS:

First Term Essay 10%; First Term Test 10%; Internet Research Project 15%; Second Term Essay 15%; Class Participation 10%; 3 pop Quizzes 5% each; Final Examination 25%. (subject to change)

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS:

Atwood, The Edible Woman; Chopin, The Awakening; Morrison, Sula; Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Brown, Rubyfruit Jungle; Bedier-Belloc, Tristan and Isuelt; Shakespeare, “Romeo and Juliet”; Hwang, “M. Butterfly”; Bornstein, Gender Outlaw; Finnbogason and Valleau, Canadian Writer’s Pocket Guide; A Course Kit is available from the York Bookstore.

COURSE DIRECTOR: D. Orr

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.
Course Credit Exclusions: AP/HUMA 1950 6.00, AP/HUMA 1950 9.00 (prior to Fall 2013).
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 1830 6.00, AS/HUMA 1950 9.00.